Posts tagged Lit

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“‎The game had started. Everybody was assuring everybody else how reliable they were. In fact, nobody trusted anybody but themselves” 
― Henning Mankell, The White Lioness

The execution-style murder of a Swedish housewife looks like a simple case even though there is no obvious suspect. But then Wallander learns of a determined stalker, and soon enough, the cops catch up with him. But when his alibi turns out to be airtight, they realize that what seemed a simple crime of passion is actually far more complex—and dangerous. The search for the truth behind the killing eventually uncovers an assassination plot, and Wallander soon finds himself in a tangle with both the secret police and a ruthless foreign agent. Combining compelling insights into the sinister side of modern life with a riveting tale of international intrigue, The White Lioness keeps you on the knife-edge of suspense. 

“‎The game had started. Everybody was assuring everybody else how reliable they were. In fact, nobody trusted anybody but themselves” 

― Henning Mankell, The White Lioness

The execution-style murder of a Swedish housewife looks like a simple case even though there is no obvious suspect. But then Wallander learns of a determined stalker, and soon enough, the cops catch up with him. But when his alibi turns out to be airtight, they realize that what seemed a simple crime of passion is actually far more complex—and dangerous. The search for the truth behind the killing eventually uncovers an assassination plot, and Wallander soon finds himself in a tangle with both the secret police and a ruthless foreign agent. Combining compelling insights into the sinister side of modern life with a riveting tale of international intrigue, The White Lioness keeps you on the knife-edge of suspense. 

Filed under The White Lioness Henning Mankell Lit

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vintageanchorbooks:

“Everyone has secrets,” she replied neutrally. “It’s just a matter of finding out what they are.”—from The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson

vintageanchorbooks:

“Everyone has secrets,” she replied neutrally. “It’s just a matter of finding out what they are.”
—from The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson

Filed under lit

13 notes

vintageanchorbooks:

“Anyone who writes about crime as a reflection of society has been inspired to some extent by what they wrote…. Sjöwall and Wahlöö broke with the hopelessly stereotyped character descriptions that were so prevalent. They showed people evolving right before the reader’s eyes.”— Henning Mankell, from his introduction to the “Roseanna”The masterful first novel in the Martin Beck series of mysteries by the internationally renowned crime writing duo Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö, finds Beck hunting for the murderer of a lonely traveler.On a July afternoon, a young woman’s body is dredged from Sweden’s beautiful Lake Vattern. With no clues Beck begins an investigation not only to uncover a murderer but also to discover who the victim was. Three months later, all Beck knows is that her name was Roseanna and that she could have been strangled by any one of eighty-five people on a cruise. As the melancholic Beck narrows the list of suspects, he is drawn increasingly to the enigma of the victim, a free-spirited traveler with a penchant for casual sex, and to the psychopathology of a murderer with a distinctive—indeed, terrifying—sense of propriety. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/vLfXs

vintageanchorbooks:

“Anyone who writes about crime as a reflection of society has been inspired to some extent by what they wrote…. Sjöwall and Wahlöö broke with the hopelessly stereotyped character descriptions that were so prevalent. They showed people evolving right before the reader’s eyes.”
— Henning Mankell, from his introduction to the “Roseanna”

The masterful first novel in the Martin Beck series of mysteries by the internationally renowned crime writing duo Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö, finds Beck hunting for the murderer of a lonely traveler.On a July afternoon, a young woman’s body is dredged from Sweden’s beautiful Lake Vattern. With no clues Beck begins an investigation not only to uncover a murderer but also to discover who the victim was. Three months later, all Beck knows is that her name was Roseanna and that she could have been strangled by any one of eighty-five people on a cruise. As the melancholic Beck narrows the list of suspects, he is drawn increasingly to the enigma of the victim, a free-spirited traveler with a penchant for casual sex, and to the psychopathology of a murderer with a distinctive—indeed, terrifying—sense of propriety. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/vLfXs

Filed under lit

9 notes

vintageanchorbooks:

“He certainly seemed to have all the qualities of a gentleman, but the interesting kind who knows exactly when to stop behaving like one.” ― Michael Dibdin, MedusaAfter a decomposed body is discovered in an abandoned military tunnel, Inspector Aurelio Zen travels north to the Italian Alps to investigate. At first glance, the death appears to have been an accident. But when Zen takes a closer look, a mysterious tattoo begins to tell a much more sinister tale, especially after the body is snatched from the morgue. As Zen races to discover the inner workings of a clandestine military organization named Medusa, he is reminded of just how lethal Italian history can be. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/vIzai

vintageanchorbooks:

“He certainly seemed to have all the qualities of a gentleman, but the interesting kind who knows exactly when to stop behaving like one.”
― Michael Dibdin, Medusa

After a decomposed body is discovered in an abandoned military tunnel, Inspector Aurelio Zen travels north to the Italian Alps to investigate. At first glance, the death appears to have been an accident. But when Zen takes a closer look, a mysterious tattoo begins to tell a much more sinister tale, especially after the body is snatched from the morgue. As Zen races to discover the inner workings of a clandestine military organization named Medusa, he is reminded of just how lethal Italian history can be. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/vIzai

Filed under Lit

33 notes

vintageanchorbooks:

"He wasn’t just big. He was a giant. He looked seven feet high, and he wore the loudest clothes I ever saw on a really big man. Pleated maroon pants, a rough grayish coat with white billiard balls for buttons, brown suede shoes with explosions in white kid on them, a brown shirt, a yellow tie, a large red carnation, and a front-door handkerchief the color of the Irish flag. It was neatly arranged in three points, under the red carnation. On Central Avenue, not the quietest dressed street in the world, with that size and that make-up he looked about as unobtrusive as a tarantula on a slice of angel food.” —from “Try the Girl” (1937), by Raymond Chandler An unstoppable anthology of crime stories culled from Black Mask magazine the legendary publication that turned a pulp phenomenon into literary mainstream. Black Mask was the apotheosis of noir. It was the magazine where the first hardboiled detective story, which was written by Carroll John Daly appeared. It was the slum in which such American literary titans like Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler got their start, and it was the home of stories with titles like “Murder Is Bad Luck,” “Ten Carets of Lead,” and “Drop Dead Twice.” Collected here is best of the best, the hardest of the hardboiled, and the darkest of the dark of America’s finest crime fiction. Including Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon as it was originally published.

vintageanchorbooks:

"He wasn’t just big. He was a giant. He looked seven feet high, and he wore the loudest clothes I ever saw on a really big man.
Pleated maroon pants, a rough grayish coat with white billiard balls for buttons, brown suede shoes with explosions in white kid on them, a brown shirt, a yellow tie, a large red carnation, and a front-door handkerchief the color of the Irish flag. It was neatly arranged in three points, under the red carnation. On Central Avenue, not the quietest dressed street in the world, with that size and that make-up he looked about as unobtrusive as a tarantula on a slice of angel food.”
—from “Try the Girl” (1937), by Raymond Chandler

An unstoppable anthology of crime stories culled from Black Mask magazine the legendary publication that turned a pulp phenomenon into literary mainstream. Black Mask was the apotheosis of noir. It was the magazine where the first hardboiled detective story, which was written by Carroll John Daly appeared. It was the slum in which such American literary titans like Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler got their start, and it was the home of stories with titles like “Murder Is Bad Luck,” “Ten Carets of Lead,” and “Drop Dead Twice.” Collected here is best of the best, the hardest of the hardboiled, and the darkest of the dark of America’s finest crime fiction. Including Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon as it was originally published.

Filed under Lit

94 notes

vintageanchorbooks:

“Anticipation! It occurred to him that his anticipation was more pleasant to him than the experiencing.”  ― Patricia Highsmith, The Talented Mr. Ripley

vintageanchorbooks:

“Anticipation! It occurred to him that his anticipation was more pleasant to him than the experiencing.”
― Patricia Highsmith, The Talented Mr. Ripley

Filed under Lit

18 notes

vintageanchorbooks:

“She held him at arms’ length, looked at the pipe still gripped inn his hand, then looked at his face and read him like a book. She ran the tip of her red tongue slowly across her full cushiony, sensuous lips, making them wet-red and looked him straight in the eyes with her own glassy, speckled bedroom eyes.The man drowned.When he came up, he stared back, passion cocked, his whole black being on a live-wire edge. Ready! Solid ready to cut throats, crack skulls, dodge police, steal hearses, drink muddy water, live in a hollow log, and take any rape-fiend chance to be once more in the arms of his high-yellow heart.” ― Chester Himes, A Rage in Harlem

vintageanchorbooks:

“She held him at arms’ length, looked at the pipe still gripped inn his hand, then looked at his face and read him like a book. She ran the tip of her red tongue slowly across her full cushiony, sensuous lips, making them wet-red and looked him straight in the eyes with her own glassy, speckled bedroom eyes.

The man drowned.

When he came up, he stared back, passion cocked, his whole black being on a live-wire edge. Ready! Solid ready to cut throats, crack skulls, dodge police, steal hearses, drink muddy water, live in a hollow log, and take any rape-fiend chance to be once more in the arms of his high-yellow heart.”
― Chester Himes, A Rage in Harlem

Filed under lit

2 notes

"This is not a case [but] a political situation waiting to explode.” —from NORTH OF MONTANA FBI Special Agent Ana Grey debuts in this electrifying thriller marked by psychological acuity and unfaltering suspense. After Ana Grey pulls off “the most amazing arrest of the year,” the squad supervisor—who doesn’t like irreverent, tough-minded young women—gives her a reprimand instead of the promotion she deserves. As a test, she is assigned a high-profile case involving a beloved Hollywood movie star and an illegal supply of prescription drugs. It doesn’t take Ana and her partner, Mike Donnato, long to realize “this is not a case” but “a political situation waiting to explode”—and they’re holding the bomb. As the boundary between her private and professional lives begins to blur, Ana’s own world collides with her investigation, and she is forced to confront the searing truth about the nature of power and identity, and the mystery of her past. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/vSXwx
"This is not a case [but] a political situation waiting to explode.”
—from NORTH OF MONTANA

FBI Special Agent Ana Grey debuts in this electrifying thriller marked by psychological acuity and unfaltering suspense. After Ana Grey pulls off “the most amazing arrest of the year,” the squad supervisor—who doesn’t like irreverent, tough-minded young women—gives her a reprimand instead of the promotion she deserves. As a test, she is assigned a high-profile case involving a beloved Hollywood movie star and an illegal supply of prescription drugs. It doesn’t take Ana and her partner, Mike Donnato, long to realize “this is not a case” but “a political situation waiting to explode”—and they’re holding the bomb. As the boundary between her private and professional lives begins to blur, Ana’s own world collides with her investigation, and she is forced to confront the searing truth about the nature of power and identity, and the mystery of her past. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/vSXwx

Filed under April SMith NOrth of MOntana lit