Posts tagged Harry Hole

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PHANTOM by Jo Nesbø is now in paperback… 
 When Harry Hole moved to Hong Kong, he thought he was escaping the traumas of his life in Oslo and his career as a detective for good. But now he’s back and, although off the police force, he still has a case to solve. Oleg, the boy he helped raise, has been arrested for the murder of a fellow drug addict. Harry is convinced that Oleg is not a killer. This most personal case will send Harry into the depths of the city’s drug culture, where a shockingly deadly new street drug is gaining popularity, and will force him to confront a wrenching truth about his past in order to save Oleg and himself.

PHANTOM by Jo Nesbø is now in paperback…

When Harry Hole moved to Hong Kong, he thought he was escaping the traumas of his life in Oslo and his career as a detective for good. But now he’s back and, although off the police force, he still has a case to solve. Oleg, the boy he helped raise, has been arrested for the murder of a fellow drug addict. Harry is convinced that Oleg is not a killer. This most personal case will send Harry into the depths of the city’s drug culture, where a shockingly deadly new street drug is gaining popularity, and will force him to confront a wrenching truth about his past in order to save Oleg and himself.

Filed under Jo Nesbø Lit Phantom Harry Hole

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Jo Nesbo’s Anti-Hero: Harry Hole…Harry Hole is not your standard detective. The protagonist of nine novels by author Jo Nesbo, Hole is conflicted but driven, brilliant but reckless. Even his flaws are extreme, and sometimes it seems like a constant battle to keep those demons at bay. This is one anti-hero who plays by his own rules, and we just can’t get enough. Read on to get a full profile….
Read more here.

Jo Nesbo’s Anti-Hero: Harry Hole…

Harry Hole is not your standard detective. The protagonist of nine novels by author Jo Nesbo, Hole is conflicted but driven, brilliant but reckless. Even his flaws are extreme, and sometimes it seems like a constant battle to keep those demons at bay. This is one anti-hero who plays by his own rules, and we just can’t get enough. Read on to get a full profile….

Read more here.

Filed under Harry Hole jo nesbø Jo Nesbo The Leopard

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Scandinavian Crime Novels Hot In Hollywood

Deadline, 10-19-11: U.S. Version Of Jo Nesbo’s TV Series ‘Occupied’ Being Eyed…
"An American version of Norwegian bestselling crime author Jo Nesbo’s new TV series Occupied is being talked about, Swedish producer Marianne Gray tells me. American actors and a U.S. director are also being considered for the eight-episode Norwegian TV series, which is awaiting a green light from state broadcaster NRK. Nesbo, whose novel Headhunters is being adapted by Summit Entertainment as a $30-40 million movie…"


Filed under Crime Novel Jo Nesbo Stieg Larsson wallander henning mankell Harry Hole lis Lisbeth Salander

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The Hollywood Reporter, 5-17-11


Inside the Hunt for the Next Stieg Larsson (Cannes 2011)
by Scott Roxborough
Cannes Film FestivalSeveral Scandinavian authors are promoting their products in Cannes in the hope of replicating the success of the late author’s “Millennium” series.
CANNES —
The global success of the Millennium films — $175 million worldwide not counting David Fincher’s upcoming U.S. remake – has buyers in Cannes scrambling to find a Scandinavian crime machine to replace Millennium’s late author Stieg Larsson.


Some of the prime candidates – including
Norway’s Jo Nesbo and Swedish crime queens Camilla Lackberg and Lisa Marklund – were walking the Croisette this week, promoting adaptations of their bestselling chillers. These films – Headhunters
, The German Child and Nobel’s Last Will — are some of the first Scandi crime dramas to hit the market post-Millennium, so anticipation is high.
Not in Cannes, but still on the Nordic to-watch list are Jens Lapidus, whose Stockholm noir trilogy spawned the hit film Easy Money, picked up for the U.S. by The Weinstein Co. and for a U.S. remake by Warner Bros.
And Lars Kepler, whose The Hypnotist, the first book in a planned eight-book series, is being adapted for the big screen by Swedish Hollywood-director Lasse Hallstrom.
Aside from geography, what these authors share with Larsson and what’s causing buyers to salivate, is they bring with them proven franchises with books that have sold in dozens of territories. Marklund’s series on tabloid crime journalist Annika Bengtzon have sold some 10 million copies.
Nesbo’s novels, including those featuring alcoholic Oslo detective Harry Hole, are available in 40 countries.
Lackberg’s Fjallbacka Murder books, including The German Child, have moved 8 million copies worldwide.
Norwegian author Jo Nesbo doesn’t like the Larsson tag but the link hasn’t hurt Headhunters, which had its market premiere in Cannes on Monday. Magnolia pre-bought U.S. rights for the story of a corporate headhunter and secret art thief after seeing a five-minute promo in Berlin in February.
For his even-more successful Harry Hole franchise, Nesbo has done a deal with Working Title for a version of the latest book The Snowman.
"For a crime writer they had the best pitch," Nesbo told The Hollywood Reporter. "They said, ‘We produced Fargo.’ I said: ‘I’m listening.’"
Such is the clout of Scandinavian crime scribes these days that Nesbo was able to wrangle out veto rights on the director and screenwriter for The Snowman film, which is still in development.
But Jenny Gilbertsson, the producer who is adapting Marklund’s Annika Bengtzon books for the big screen, warns of expecting any of these new authors to duplicate Stieg Larsson’s jaw-dropping success.
"These are very successful authors and they are very good and Millennium has definitely improved the market for Scandinavian crime internationally," Gilbertsson said. "But these are all very different writers and Stieg Larsson, the way he told a story, and his creation of this nearly autistic hacker Lisbeth Salander — was unique, not just in Swedish crime but worldwide."

Lackberg just returned from a U.S. tour to Cannes, where TrustNordisk is pre-selling The Fjallbacka Murders, planned as two features films and TV series based on the adventures of small town author and crime solver Erica Falck.
"I know everyone’s looking for the next Stieg Larsson. Well, I’m available," Lackberg joked, adding that the success of Millennium "opened up the door for Scandinavian writers. Suddenly, we’re on the map."


###

The Hollywood Reporter, 5-17-11

Inside the Hunt for the Next Stieg Larsson (Cannes 2011)

by Scott Roxborough

Cannes Film FestivalSeveral Scandinavian authors are promoting their products in Cannes in the hope of replicating the success of the late author’s “Millennium” series.

CANNES —

The global success of the Millennium films — $175 million worldwide not counting David Fincher’s upcoming U.S. remake – has buyers in Cannes scrambling to find a Scandinavian crime machine to replace Millennium’s late author Stieg Larsson.

Some of the prime candidates – including

Norway’s Jo Nesbo and Swedish crime queens Camilla Lackberg and Lisa Marklund – were walking the Croisette this week, promoting adaptations of their bestselling chillers. These films – Headhunters

, The German Child and Nobel’s Last Will — are some of the first Scandi crime dramas to hit the market post-Millennium, so anticipation is high.

Not in Cannes, but still on the Nordic to-watch list are Jens Lapidus, whose Stockholm noir trilogy spawned the hit film Easy Money, picked up for the U.S. by The Weinstein Co. and for a U.S. remake by Warner Bros.

And Lars Kepler, whose The Hypnotist, the first book in a planned eight-book series, is being adapted for the big screen by Swedish Hollywood-director Lasse Hallstrom.

Aside from geography, what these authors share with Larsson and what’s causing buyers to salivate, is they bring with them proven franchises with books that have sold in dozens of territories. Marklund’s series on tabloid crime journalist Annika Bengtzon have sold some 10 million copies.

Nesbo’s novels, including those featuring alcoholic Oslo detective Harry Hole, are available in 40 countries.

Lackberg’s Fjallbacka Murder books, including The German Child, have moved 8 million copies worldwide.

Norwegian author Jo Nesbo doesn’t like the Larsson tag but the link hasn’t hurt Headhunters, which had its market premiere in Cannes on Monday. Magnolia pre-bought U.S. rights for the story of a corporate headhunter and secret art thief after seeing a five-minute promo in Berlin in February.

For his even-more successful Harry Hole franchise, Nesbo has done a deal with Working Title for a version of the latest book The Snowman.

"For a crime writer they had the best pitch," Nesbo told The Hollywood Reporter. "They said, ‘We produced Fargo.’ I said: ‘I’m listening.’"

Such is the clout of Scandinavian crime scribes these days that Nesbo was able to wrangle out veto rights on the director and screenwriter for The Snowman film, which is still in development.

But Jenny Gilbertsson, the producer who is adapting Marklund’s Annika Bengtzon books for the big screen, warns of expecting any of these new authors to duplicate Stieg Larsson’s jaw-dropping success.

"These are very successful authors and they are very good and Millennium has definitely improved the market for Scandinavian crime internationally," Gilbertsson said. "But these are all very different writers and Stieg Larsson, the way he told a story, and his creation of this nearly autistic hacker Lisbeth Salander — was unique, not just in Swedish crime but worldwide."

Lackberg just returned from a U.S. tour to Cannes, where TrustNordisk is pre-selling The Fjallbacka Murders, planned as two features films and TV series based on the adventures of small town author and crime solver Erica Falck.

"I know everyone’s looking for the next Stieg Larsson. Well, I’m available," Lackberg joked, adding that the success of Millennium "opened up the door for Scandinavian writers. Suddenly, we’re on the map."

###

Filed under stieg larsson jo nesbo harry Hole

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NEWSWEEK: Scandinavian Thriller Obsession; The new wave of post–Stieg Larsson novels beats the Americans at their own genre.

The Scandinavians did it. They walked into a Barnes & Noble in broad daylight and bumped off the American crime writers. How’d it happen? The purring new thriller The Snowman, by Norwegian writer Jo Nesbø, provides a clue.

The Snowman is set in Oslo. Unlike Dashiell Hammett’s Poisonville, Oslo doesn’t have evil oozing out of the sewer grates. Norway, one character notes, has never produced a serial killer. Then married women start turning up dead in the snowdrifts, and Inspector Harry Hole hops on the trail.

 Hole is a newly sober man who’s experiencing a hangover of the soul. Armed with an “ugly face” and “kind eyes,” he slogs through his work like a weary civil servant. (“Harry sighed. November. It was going to get even darker.”) But Hole’s slouch disguises a keen intellect—he’s quick to pick out tics in a suspect’s speech—and a ballooning ego. Hole thinks of himself as a master sleuth. He almost hopes the crimes will be the work of an especially worthy adversary so it will countenance his talent. “I think you want this case to be special,” his chief says. Hole wants nothing less than the Norwegian Ted Bundy.

Snow fills the air. It’s as key to the mood of The Snowman as the radiating California sun is to Raymond Chandler’s books. Snowflakes, Nesbø writes, descend like “an armada from outer space.” Snow covers the grass like a “down duvet” and “grayish-white wool.” Later: “The body was covered with white crystals, as if a layer of white fungus had been feeding on it.” If you think Inuits have countless words for snow, get a load of the Scandinavian crime writers.

The Snowman is probably the only book this summer that will feature the sentence “Harry drove along Uranienborgveien and Majorstuveien to avoid the traffic lights on Bogstadveien.” Yet as you flip the pages, something about the book begins to feel familiar. The crusty Hole’s favorite drink is Jim Beam. His personal life is a shambles. His office is decorated with photos of dead colleagues. Even a junior Pinkerton detective can predict that when Hole gets a beautiful female partner she’ll match him in pluck and, inevitably, earn his hard-won respect.

What makes you cry “uff da” is Nesbø’s final cop-genre cliché: the serial killer sizing up Hole and declaring,“We were in the same business, Harry.” This isn’t Norwegian. It’s full-blooded American. The Snowman is strung together with great care, playful in certain stretches, grisly in others, all of it highly readable. But Nesbø is intent on looting from Hall of Fame mystery writers stretching from Hammett to Michael Connelly. It’s as depressing as when you discover a talented European director who wants to be the next George Lucas.

 Perversely, this may be why Americans dig Scandinavian crime novels. The dark skies and wintry settings convince us mystery lovers that we’re heading off into terra incognita. But the plots are warm and comforting, full of archetypes we’ve come to love. The Swedes and Norwegians haven’t killed American writers. They’ve become their vigilant heirs. These are the same mean streets they’re taking us down, only now they’re covered with snow.

NEWSWEEK: Scandinavian Thriller Obsession; The new wave of post–Stieg Larsson novels beats the Americans at their own genre.

The Scandinavians did it. They walked into a Barnes & Noble in broad daylight and bumped off the American crime writers. How’d it happen? The purring new thriller The Snowman, by Norwegian writer Jo Nesbø, provides a clue.

The Snowman is set in Oslo. Unlike Dashiell Hammett’s Poisonville, Oslo doesn’t have evil oozing out of the sewer grates. Norway, one character notes, has never produced a serial killer. Then married women start turning up dead in the snowdrifts, and Inspector Harry Hole hops on the trail.

 Hole is a newly sober man who’s experiencing a hangover of the soul. Armed with an “ugly face” and “kind eyes,” he slogs through his work like a weary civil servant. (“Harry sighed. November. It was going to get even darker.”) But Hole’s slouch disguises a keen intellect—he’s quick to pick out tics in a suspect’s speech—and a ballooning ego. Hole thinks of himself as a master sleuth. He almost hopes the crimes will be the work of an especially worthy adversary so it will countenance his talent. “I think you want this case to be special,” his chief says. Hole wants nothing less than the Norwegian Ted Bundy.

Snow fills the air. It’s as key to the mood of The Snowman as the radiating California sun is to Raymond Chandler’s books. Snowflakes, Nesbø writes, descend like “an armada from outer space.” Snow covers the grass like a “down duvet” and “grayish-white wool.” Later: “The body was covered with white crystals, as if a layer of white fungus had been feeding on it.” If you think Inuits have countless words for snow, get a load of the Scandinavian crime writers.

The Snowman is probably the only book this summer that will feature the sentence “Harry drove along Uranienborgveien and Majorstuveien to avoid the traffic lights on Bogstadveien.” Yet as you flip the pages, something about the book begins to feel familiar. The crusty Hole’s favorite drink is Jim Beam. His personal life is a shambles. His office is decorated with photos of dead colleagues. Even a junior Pinkerton detective can predict that when Hole gets a beautiful female partner she’ll match him in pluck and, inevitably, earn his hard-won respect.

What makes you cry “uff da” is Nesbø’s final cop-genre cliché: the serial killer sizing up Hole and declaring,“We were in the same business, Harry.” This isn’t Norwegian. It’s full-blooded American. The Snowman is strung together with great care, playful in certain stretches, grisly in others, all of it highly readable. But Nesbø is intent on looting from Hall of Fame mystery writers stretching from Hammett to Michael Connelly. It’s as depressing as when you discover a talented European director who wants to be the next George Lucas.

 Perversely, this may be why Americans dig Scandinavian crime novels. The dark skies and wintry settings convince us mystery lovers that we’re heading off into terra incognita. But the plots are warm and comforting, full of archetypes we’ve come to love. The Swedes and Norwegians haven’t killed American writers. They’ve become their vigilant heirs. These are the same mean streets they’re taking us down, only now they’re covered with snow.

Filed under jo nesbo Harry Hole